3 Galaxies Spinning Around ‘Something’ at High Speed!

    The James Webb Space Telescope, which started its activities in the summer of 2022, shook the world in July with its first observations. While …

    3 Galaxies Spinning Around ‘Something’ at High Speed!

    The James Webb Space Telescope, which started its activities in the summer of 2022, shook the world in July with its first observations. While the telescope has been a tool for many observations and new discoveries, today a new one has been added to the middle of these discoveries.

    In the middle of the first 13 objects viewed by the James Webb Space Telescope, scientists SDSS J165202.64+172852.3 He had the chance to observe the red quasar named ”. The scene captured by Webb and then processed with filters revealed valuable details about the quasar.

    James Webb’s image that enables new discoveries:

    Click to view in full size. (44.80MB)

    The image you see above is merging around a rare quasar inside a “monster” black hole. cluster of galaxies is showing. The quasar in question was already in the middle of candidates that astronomers thought might have a supermassive black hole.

    The colors we see in the cluster of galaxies actually tell us different things. Green, while showing that galaxies are not in motion (from our point of view) red sectionsGalaxies moving away from Earth at a speed of 700 kilometers per second, blue sectionsrepresents galaxies approaching 350 kilometers from Earth.

    The top image, which is the clearest photograph ever taken from this region, revealed another valuable piece of information. Scientists are now in this region at least three galaxies He saw something spinning around him at very high speed. But what makes the galaxies spin around is now a mystery. If the natural theory is correct, it could be a supermassive black hole.

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