The First Android Phone Introduced Exactly 10 Years Ago

    For most people – for good reason – the first smartphone is the iPhone, since there was no widely produced and sold smartphone before. Although …

    The First Android Phone Introduced Exactly 10 Years Ago

    For most people – for good reason – the first smartphone is the iPhone, since there was no widely produced and sold smartphone before. Although trials were made in the 1990s, the market did not move until the iPhone came along. However, about a year later, the real revolution in the smartphone world took place: Android.

    The first Android phone was announced in September 2008 and went on sale on October 22. In addition to the iPhone, BlackBerry was also blowing in the market. The biggest reason for the iPhone wind in this middle is that the phone was not offered for sale exclusively to the AT&T operator.

    Following AT&T’s acquisition of the iPhone, US carrier T-Mobile also signed with HTC and released the first Android phone called the G1:

    T-Mobile G1, manufactured by HTC, had a 3.2-inch 320×480 screen. The device using Qualcomm’s MSM7201A chip on the processor side Its RAM is 192 MBwas at the level.

    The storage capacity of the phone was 256 MB. There was also a microSD slot on the device, which is not found in some today’s phones:

    Android reached 2.7 billion users in 14 years:

    Proving itself in performance with very fast flagship devices such as the Samsung Galaxy Note9, Android has also been made accessible to everyone within the scope of projects such as Android One.

    The Android ecosystem, which started with the T-Mobile G1, has already become one of Google’s most successful projects. The Android world, which has become a real ‘ecosystem’ with different systems such as Chromebook, Chromecast and Wear OS, owes its current position to T-Mobile G1.

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