The truth is not Latife: The patient who played the saxophone during his own brain surgery

    Not long ago, a man opened his skull to test the credible endings of physicians to access his brain and remove a tumor. played the saxophone …

    The truth is not Latife: The patient who played the saxophone during his own brain surgery

    Not long ago, a man opened his skull to test the credible endings of physicians to access his brain and remove a tumor. played the saxophone during a nine-hour surgery I. Known as an awake craniotomy, the procedure has historically tasked patients to do everything from playing the violin or guitar to stuffing olives, allowing physicians to monitor the function of their brains during the operation.

    Dr. Christian Brogna In an interview with CBS News, the vigilant brain surgery on the 35-year-old musician was reported to have been successful. Although it was a complex operation, Brogna was able to remove the tumor without any adverse side effects.

    Brogna said: The tumor was located in a very complex region of the brain. Moreover, the patient was left-handed. This makes things more complicated as the neural pathways of the brain are much more complex.

    Why are they doing brain surgery while awake?

    Being conscious when you know that there is someone in your brain at that moment, it must be quite a difficult situation to accept. But this unconventional approach to tumor removal is seen as an effective way to assess which parts of the vital organ can be cut without losing function. Tumors and healthy brain tissue are extremely similar to the human eye, and so separating the two puts surgeons at risk of cutting out functional tissue vital to cognitive or motor function.

    Being vigilant during the cutting phase of surgery means that patients have the opportunity to show signs of loss of function before it’s too late. Awake craniotomies Typically, this involves anesthetizing patients while surgeons cut through the skull to gain access (which would be an excruciatingly painful process for an awake patient). They can then work on the brain while the patient is awake without the pain receptor.

    Surgeons can test the effects of cutting brain modules by applying small electrical currents to stimulate tissue. If a patient reacts negatively to this part of the brain being stimulated, The surgeon knows not to cut this part of the brain.

    These tests are performed with speech therapists who always test the awake patient for three medical defects related to their speech. The first flaw is semantic, that is, the patient gives a wrong response when describing an object, but the word he says during this wrong response is related to the real response. For example, the patient may say “fork” when shown a picture of a spoon.

    The second flaw is phonemic (phonemic), so false and true counterparts are phonetically exemplary words. An example would be to say “stone” when the real answer is head. The patient is often completely unaware of saying the wrong words at this time.

    The third type of error is the cessation of speech, that is, the patient completely loses his ability to speak while trying to answer. This situation is noticed by the patient and can be a cause of great tension. Therefore, an extensive interview process is a matter of opinion before patients are selected for a vigilant craniotomy to assess whether they can emotionally cope with the strain of such a strange and unpleasant procedure.

    While it is undoubtedly a daunting procedure, operations like this can save people from dangerous tumors without reducing their quality of life. A bonus though is that surgeons listen to a saxophone concert during their practice.

    AUTHOR INFO
    COMMENTS

    This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

    No comments yet, be the first by filling the form.